Clean Car's What is Buy Here Pay Here

What is Buy Here Pay Here?
Content Provided by Autotrader.com

If you've found that every other credit avenue for financing a car is closed to you, a Buy Here Pay Here (BHPH) dealer may be your last, and best, resort. Most of us simply can't afford to buy a car with cash. Typically, we borrow money for a car through third-party lenders, such as banks, credit unions and carmaker-associated lending companies. For a variety of reasons, however (such as a spotty credit history, no credit or a very low credit score), traditional lenders may not work for you. If that's the case, there are always BHPH dealers.

Happy woman at buy here pay here dealership taking vehicle for test drive with sales representative

What Is Buy Here Pay Here Financing?
BHPH financing means that you arrange the loan and make payments on it at the dealership where you purchased the car. In other words, it's a one-stop shopping process because the car dealer is also the finance company.

Because loan decisions are made by the BHPH dealer, who wants to sell you a car, approval is nearly always guaranteed. If you have an address and a steady income, your chances for approval are very good.

Granting you a loan, however, isn't out of the goodness of the dealer's heart; they will probably make as much, or more, profit on the financing as they do on the car itself. As a high-risk borrower, you can expect a double-digit interest rate.

It's helpful to find a dealer close to your home or work because, rather than mailing a monthly payment, the BHPH dealer might require you to make weekly or biweekly trips to the dealership to pay in person. Although some will accept payment online or by mail or phone, BHPH usually means physically bringing your payment to the dealership.

Benefits of BHPH
  • They put credit-challenged borrowers in a car when a traditional lender will not.
  • On-time payments can help repair your credit history (but be sure that the BHPH dealer reports payment histories to the credit bureau).
  • They buy older cars and will be more willing to take in an old beater toward the down payment of a new car.

Original Source: Autotrader.com, September 2014, Russ Heaps

Nashville International Auto Show

Nashville International Auto Show
October 12-14, 2018

Over 350 of the hottest new cars and trucks all in one place!

Event host introducing new SUV and child playing in driving simulator

New cars, trucks and SUVs will fill Music City Center for the 2019 Nashville International Auto Show! October 12-14, 2018. The Nashville International Auto Show is presented and produced by Motor Trend Auto Shows, LLC, the nation’s largest auto show producer. The auto show will be open to the public Friday through Sunday at the Music City Center in Nashville.

Here are some of the most exciting highlights about the Nashville International Auto Show:
  1. See over 350 vehicles - Sit, touch, and experience the latest 2018 makes and models!
  2. DuPont Registry Live - Lamborghini, McLaren, Ferrari, Maserati and more!
  3. Over 35 Test Drives - Get behind the wheel and test drive over 35 cars right at the show!
  4. No Sales Pressure - Product specialists to answer questions with no pressure to buy!
  5. Family Fun - Interactive displays brings fun for all ages!
For more information, visit AutoShowNashville.com

Original Source: AutoShowNashville.com

Clean Car's 10 Best Cars Under $8,000

Clean Car's 10 Best Cars Under $8,000
Content Provided by KBB.com

Four reliable foreign and domestic sedans available for less that eight thousand dollars


If you've been pricing new cars at KBB.com, you know that they are more expensive than ever. However, there are plenty of good used-car alternatives out there. While $8,000 isn't going to get you the newest technology, if you do your homework you can find good, reliable transportation. Based on the research and recommendations of our Kelley Blue Book editors, here are the 10 Best Used Cars under $8,000:

  1. 2010 Kia Soul - One of the most uniquely styled vehicles out there, the cool Kia Soul isn't your typical-looking car, but has the practicality hatchback buyers crave. It's roomier than you think, and will carry a lot of cargo or haul passengers in surprising comfort. If you're looking for an alternative to a small SUV and don't need all-wheel drive, the Soul will fill the bill.
  2. 2009 Mazda3 - A perennial member of our 10 Coolest New Cars Under $18,000, the Mazda3 will not only provide you reliable, fuel-efficient personal transport, but is also filled with fun-to-drive character. It's available as a sedan or a hatchback, each practical in its own way.
  3. 2008 Subaru Impreza - The Subaru Impreza, offered as a sedan or wagon, offers inexpensive, reliable transportation with the added benefit of all-wheel drive. That can be a huge advantage in bad weather where it can mean the difference between getting to your destination or getting stuck.
  4. 2008 Nissan Maxima - A class up from midsize sedans like the Honda Accord, Toyota Camry and Nissan Altima, the 2008 Nissan Maxima is a sporty and comfortable sedan with a good track record. It offers a roomy interior, a higher level of equipment and luxury, and pleasant ride characteristics.
  5. 2007 Subaru Outback - Known for its poise in all weather conditions, the all-wheel-drive Subaru Outback was available as a sedan and a wagon in the 2007 model year, with trim levels ranging from low-key to downright luxurious. While you might prefer the styling of the sedan, the wagon will give you the advantage of more cargo space.
  6. 2010 Ford Crown Victoria - Long the favorite of limo drivers, taxi drivers, and police forces, the Crown Victoria has proven reliable over the long run -- even when driven hard. Plus, you will be thoroughly impressed by the rear seat space and how deep the Crown Vic's trunk is.
  7. 2009 Toyota Corolla - Compared to other cars in its segment, the Corolla seems to be "overbullt" like most Toyotas. That translates to solid reliability with few problems. For 2009, there's a choice of a fuel-efficient base engine or a larger 4-cylinder engine that offers more performance.
  8. 2009 Honda Civic - Generation after generation, the Honda Civic has been the benchmark for compact cars. It isn’t just incredibly reliable; it is also refined and a lot of fun to drive. Available in both coupe and four-door models, the coupe has a more attractive style, but we’d suggest the four-door for its utility.
  9. 2007 Honda Accord - While you have to go back to 2007 to find a Honda Accord for under $8,000, that strong resale value is an indication of how much quality, reliability and value the Accord offers. The 2007 Accord was a comfortable, economical and surprisingly fun-to-drive car new, and well-maintained examples remain so to this day.
  10. 2007 Toyota Avalon - The Toyota Avalon is a contemporary sedan that's big, quiet and comfortable, tailor-made for miles of effortless travel. Not only is the Toyota Avalon made in America, it was also designed and developed in America to suit American tastes. As is the case with Toyotas, the Avalon is also remarkably reliable.

Original Source: KBB.com, December 5, 2017

Five Buy Here, Pay Here Dealership Shopping Tips

Clean Car's Five Buy Here, Pay Here Dealership Shopping Tips
Content Provided by AutoInfluence.com

Buy here, pay here dealerships can be intimidating. High-interest rates, due to bad credit, a selection of only used cars, and a whole new way of buying a car might put you off from the experience entirely. But, it doesn’t have to be that way. If you follow these five tips, not only will it make getting a car from a buy here, pay here dealership easier, it will also make it less stressful.

Which is what everyone — dealerships and consumers — both want for a car-buying experience. After all, the less stressed you are, the easier it makes their job. The easier their job, the more efficient they can be. It all comes full circle in the end.

Finance manager calculating loan information in buy here pay here dealership

  • Learn the Car's Origin: I’m not saying all buy here, pay here dealerships are untrustworthy. Nor am I saying all of them are trustworthy. But just like any used car purchase, you’ll want to learn the origin of the car before purchasing it. The shopping process might be done differently, but there is nothing against looking at a CarFax report to learn about any mechanical trouble the car has experienced, or accidents it might have encountered. Therefore, you’ll want to make sure you check that out. If the dealership refuses to show you a vehicle history or CarFax report, then walk away and look for one that will.
  • Get in Inspected Independently: Same goes for an independent mechanic inspecting your prospective purchase – if the dealership won’t let you test drive the vehicle so you can see firsthand that the vehicle is in good condition, then don’t buy it. Chances are, the dealership is trying to hide something. Hey, it’s not just buy here, pay here dealerships that would do this. There are plenty of unscrupulous used car lots out there as well.
  • Short Term Financing is Key: Although it will be hard to negotiate terms because of your poor credit, still shoot for short term financing. That doesn’t mean a smaller amount with increased frequency of payments — you’ll already be paying bi-weekly, most likely — but I mean short-term financing of a relative low bi-weekly payment over the course of 32 months instead of 64. That way, you keep the interest rate down and save yourself some money.
  • Pay a Larger Downpayment in Cash: One of the best ways to reduce your payments? Simple! Pay a larger down payment in cash first. Just like “standard” car buying, the more you pay upfront, the more you reduce the overall loan term. Aim for at least 20%, and if the BHPH dealer requests more than that, consider it a good thing. Just make sure to negotiate short term financing if you are paying more than average on a down payment. This way, you’ll know for a fact the down payment actually put a dent in the overall price of the car.
  • Get What you Need - Not Want: Finally, get what you need — not what you want. If your budget is $14,000 and you find a used car that works for $7,000, then buy that one. Don’t get one that’s more expensive simply because it has heated seats or leather upholstery. Take that chunk of change you saved and put a big down payment on the cheaper car, and put the rest in the bank to help with repairs or get a jump start on paying off your loan. Eventually, your credit score will go up if you’re good with making the bi-weekly payments in cash (which is how most BHPH dealers take payments). Then, you can refinance the loan, pay that car off quicker, and upgrade to a new one.

Original Source: AutoInfluence.com, January 25, 2017, Roger Rapoza

How Long Should a New Set of Tires Last?

Clean Car's How Long Should a New Set of Tires Last?
Content Provided by CarAndDriver.com

A pile of old tires and an automotive service technician repairing car wheels

It may be tentative, but tires do have an expiration date. There is a general consensus that most tires should be inspected, if not replaced, at about six years and should be absolutely be swapped out after 10 years, regardless of how much tread they have left. How do you know how old your tires are? There’s a code on the sidewall that you can read about here. Wear is a far more straightforward consideration: Tiremakers and safety advocates say a tire is worn out when its tread depth reaches 2/32 of an inch. That’s all fine, but what most car owners want to know is how long to expect a set of new tires to last before they need to be replaced.

“I wish it were simple to say how long each tire might last, but tires are different,” said Dan Zielinski, a spokesman for the U.S. Tire Manufacturers Association (USTMA). “Some tire manufacturers offer a warranty as high as 80,000 miles or more, reflecting confidence in that particular product’s longevity based on its engineering, technology, and design. Other tires may be built to provide 30,000 miles of service.” Or less; some high-performance tires on cars driven aggressively will be worn to the 2/32-inch point without ever seeing 15,000 miles, but those are extreme cases.

The average American drives between 14,000 and 15,000 miles a year, according to data from the Federal Highway Administration. Zielinski said that, if you’re kind to your tires—that is, you aren’t constantly peeling out at stoplights and you properly maintain them—most new tires on the market today will last about 60,000 miles. For what it’s worth, the USTMA did a review of several thousand recently scrapped tires and found that most were three to four years old. There was no way of telling how many miles were on those tires, but it’s easy enough to multiply four years by 15,000 miles annually to confirm the rough approximation of tire durability.

If you want to figure out how soon you’ll wear out the tires on your car, Zielinski said it would be a good idea to start by determining how many miles you drive each year. Divide the number of miles on the odometer by how many years you’ve owned the car (starting, obviously, from when you first got the car and accounting for any mileage it had on it at that time). Then you can compare that with any advertised warranty on the make and model of the tires and figure out how many years of service to expect. If you live where winter tires are advisable and swap those onto the car for some months of the year, your regular tires will get less use and will endure for a longer period of time, but remember the caveats about tire age.

Zielinski also noted that if you hit the wear bars at 50,000 miles on a set of tires with a 60,000-mile warranty, for example, tiremakers that offer such coverage will typically  prorate the price of a new set. In this example, you could expect a discount on the new set equal to one-sixth their price, or about 17 percent. You might not get it, though, if you decide to change brands.

Original Source: CarAndDriver.com, September 4, 2017, David Muller

Clean Car's Top Ten Car Care Tips

Clean Car's Top Ten Car Care Tips
Content Provided by KBB.com
What you can do yourself to keep your car on the road?
If everything on TV were true, then keeping a vehicle running great, looking good, and lasting a long time would be the easiest thing ever. Advertising will tell us over and over that all we really need to do to keep that car or truck running forever and looking brand new for years is to pour some bottles of miracle liquid into the crankcase, sprinkle magic dust on the paint, or spray some sort of ionized wonder water on the interior. Unfortunately this is not the case.

Following the old adage that "if it sounds too good to be true it probably is" comes the news that regular, proper care and maintenance are what really keep vehicles going into the high six-figure mileage ranges. Miracle cures, magic fairy dust, mystery polymers and the like are all fine and good for infomercials, but most likely won't do much good for your vehicle.

Regularly scheduled maintenance and lubrication using the manufacturers recommended type and formulation of oil, grease and liquids is what will do the trick. Replacing normal wear-and-tear parts such as timing belts before they break is also a good path to follow on the road to long vehicle life. Taking good care of your vehicle can make the difference between being the proud owner of a good looking, long lasting, reliable machine, and saying goodbye to a rusty, faded-paint jalopy that fell apart or broke down long before it was designed to.

Automotive service technician repairing vehicle engine

  • TIP 1: Check and change the oil. No single step will help an engine last more than regular oil and filter changes will. Conversely, nothing will destroy an engine faster than neglecting oil-level checks or fresh-oil changes.
  • TIP 2: Flush the cooling system and change coolant once a year. A 50/50 mix of coolant and distilled water will keep the cooling system in good shape and prevent corrosion and deposits from building up inside the cooling system.
  • TIP 3: Change out transmission and differential oils. While not requiring frequent service, these fluids must be changed according to service intervals. Always use transmission fluid or gear oil of the recommended type and viscosity.
  • TIP 4: Keep it clean. While washing the outside of the vehicle is obvious, most everything the vehicle ran over can also get stuck to the underside. Hosing off winter salt and road grime is a good idea.
  • TIP 5: Everything with moving parts needs grease to survive. This ball joint went into early retirement due to poor lubrication.
  • TIP 6: Nothing keeps paint looking good and protected like a coat of quality wax. Apply wax at least every six months.
  • TIP 7: Driveline components such as u-joints also require regular lubrication. The driveline may have to be removed to access the zerk grease fitting.
  • TIP 8: Protect the interior plastic by parking the vehicle in the shade, using a window deflector screen, and applying a UV protectant to prevent the plastic and vinyl from drying out.
  • TIP 9: Inspect, clean, and repack wheel bearings with wheel bearing grease according to service intervals. Wheel bearings and grease are inexpensive compared to spindle and hub replacement, or liberated wheels rolling down the road ahead of you.
  • TIP 10: Brake fluid is hygroscopic. This means it is adept at attracting moisture. Moisture causes components to corrode and fail. Replace fluid and bleed system once a year. Brake fluid is cheap. Calipers, hoses, and sensors are expensive.

Original Source: KBB.com, Mike Bumbek

Clean Car's DIY Car Detailing Hacks

Clean Car's DIY Car Detailing Hacks
Content Provided by Esurance.com and Facts Verse

13 Genius Car Cleaning Hacks 


Give Your Car the Love It Deserves: DIY Detailing in 9 Steps 
Original Source: Esurance.com, By: Ian Civgin

Automotive specialist detailing vehicle with hand cloth

Chances are, your car isn’t as clean as it could (or should) be. You’ve taken it to the hands-free car wash once every couple of months for the past 3 years, but these days, the robotic brushes and industrial blow dryers just don’t seem to do the trick — you can still see paint swirls, minor scratches, and bird poop stains — and boy oh boy, the interior could use some love. If this scenario sounds familiar, you and your car could benefit greatly from a thorough DIY detailing.

Convinced DIY detailing’s for you? Good! Let’s get started.

  1. Rid the interior of dust, dirt, and debris
  2. Cleaning the insides of your windows
  3. Restore leather and vinyl
  4. Clean your wheels
  5. Wash and dry the exterior
  6. Removing residual contaminants with paint clay
  7. Polish to perfection
  8. Wax on, wax off
  9. Make your tires shine
Phew! You’re finally done, and I bet your car looks amazing. Now all that’s left to do is admire your achievement, and oh yeah, go for a drive!

Clean Car's 10 Steps to Buying a Used Car

How to Find and Buy a Good Used Car
Content Provided by Edmunds.com

Toyota Camry and Ford Explorer driving on road

Step 1: How Much Car Can You Afford?
A rule of thumb: If you're taking out a loan to pay for your car, your car payment shouldn't be more than 20 percent of your take-home pay. If you're sticking to a tight budget, you may want to spend even less. Used cars will need a little extra attention from time to time: new tires, maintenance and the like. And then there are the other ownership costs shoppers sometimes forget to account for, such as fuel and insurance.

If the car you're planning to buy is out of warranty, it might be a good idea to set aside a "just-in-case" fund to cover any unexpected repairs.

Step 2: Build a Target List of Used Cars
It's no secret that the Honda Accord and Toyota Camry make for good used cars. But they might cost a few thousand more than a comparable Ford Fusion or Kia Optima, even though these are good cars, too. So if you're looking to save money, consider more than one brand. We suggest making a list of three cars that meet your needs and fall within your budget. Edmunds reviews have great information to guide your choices.

If you're planning to buy a vehicle that is less than 5 years old, consider one that's certified pre-owned (CPO). CPO vehicles have long-term warranties that are backed by the carmakers, not just the dealership selling it to you. Franchised dealerships that sell that same brand new are the only ones who can sell a CPO car of the same brand. So if you wanted a CPO Chevy Cruze, for example, you'd need to buy it from a Chevy dealer.

Step 3: Check Prices
Prices are driven in part by where you're shopping. You'll find used cars in used-car sections of new-car dealerships, independent used-car lots, used-car retailers such as CarMax and websites where private-party sellers list their cars. Of the four, private-party cars will usually have the lowest selling price. CPO cars will usually cost the most, but for the reasons we've noted. To see what other people are paying for the models you've picked out, Edmunds offers a quick way to see the average price paid for the car in your area.

Step 4: Locate Used Cars for Sale in Your Area
One easy place to start building your target list is the Edmunds used-car inventory page. To find exactly the car you want, you can filter your search by many factors including the miles on the car's odometer, its price and features, and dealer's distance from you. Use the websites for other used-car marketplaces mentioned to save time.

Step 5: Check the Vehicle History Report
Unless you're buying the car from a close friend or family member who can vouch for its history, plan to get a vehicle history report. This is an essential early step. If the car you're looking at has a bad history report, the sooner you know the better.

AutoCheck and Carfax are the two best-known sources for vehicle history reports, which can reveal vital information about the car, including whether the odometer has been rolled back or if it has a salvage title, which means it has been declared a total loss by the insurance company. You'll use the car's vehicle identification number (VIN) to get this information, and in some cases, all you need is the license plate number.

Step 6: Contact the Seller
Once you find a good prospective car, don't run out to see it. Call the seller first. This is a good way to establish a relationship with the seller and verify the information about the car. You can ask private-party sellers why they're parting with a car, or whether it has any mechanical problems. And if you're buying from a dealership, a phone call (or text) is the best way to ensure the car is still in stock.

Sometimes the seller will mention something that wasn't in the ad that might change your decision to buy the car. If you want to go deeper, our used car questionnaire is a good reminder of what to ask. You will notice that the last question on our list is the asking price of the car. Although many people are tempted to negotiate even before they have laid eyes on the car, it's better to wait. Once you see the car, you can tie your offer to its condition.

If things are going well, set up an appointment to test-drive the car. If possible, make it for daylight hours. That makes it easier to see the car's condition.

Step 7: Test-Drive the Car
Test-driving a used car is the best way to know if this is the right car make and model for you. It's also a good way to assess this particular car's condition. So tune out distractions and focus on the car. Here are some things to check:

  • Is it easy to get in and out of the car without stooping or banging your head?
  • Is there enough headroom, hiproom and legroom? Remember to see how these feel in the backseat, too.
  • Is the driving position comfortable? Do you sit too low, too high or just right in the car? Can you tilt or telescope the steering wheel for a better fit?
  • Are the seats comfortable? Are they easily adjustable? Is there a lumbar support adjustment for the driver? How about the front-seat passenger?
  • Do you see a lit "check engine" light? If so, get that problem checked out before buying.
  • How is the visibility? Check the rearview mirror and the side mirrors. Look for potential blind spots.
  • Use your nose. Do you smell gas, burning oil, or anything amiss?
  • Check out the tires. How old are they? Is there enough tread left?
  • How are the brakes? Are they doing the job of stopping the car? Do they squeak?
  • Pop the hood. You don't have to know a lot about cars to see if something looks wrong. If something is leaking, steaming or covered in oil, it's time to ask questions.
  • Does the air-conditioning blow cold? Do headlights, brake lights and turn indicators work? Test them to be sure.
  • After the test drive, ask the owner or dealer if you can see the service records. These will show you if the car has had the scheduled maintenance performed on time.

Step 8: Have the Car Inspected
If you like the car, consider having it inspected by a mechanic before you buy it. If you don't have a mechanic, Google and Yelp are good places to read local shops' reviews. A pre-purchase inspection costs about $100 and can alert you to problems you may not find yourself. It's a smart investment.

A private-party seller will probably allow you to do this without much resistance. Most dealerships will let you borrow a car to take to be inspected by an outside mechanic. You'll be paying the inspection, of course. If it is a CPO car, there's already been an inspection and a warranty is in place, so there is little reason to take it to a mechanic.

Step 9: Negotiate a Good Deal
Does the idea of "talking numbers" fill you with dread? It shouldn't. Negotiating doesn't have to be a drawn-out, traumatic experience. If you are reasonable and have a plan, chances are you can make a deal pretty quickly and easily:

Decide ahead of time how much you're willing to spend to get the car. But don't start with this number in your discussion.
Make an opening offer that is lower than your maximum price, but in the ballpark based on your average price paid research in Step 3. Explain that you've done research on Edmunds or wherever else, so you have facts to support your offer.
If you and the seller arrive at a price that sounds good to you and is near the average price paid, you're probably in good shape.
And remember, the people on the other side probably hate negotiating too (even if it's their job).

Step 10: Get the Paperwork Done
If you are at a dealership, you'll sign the contract in the finance and insurance office. There, you will likely be offered additional items, such as a warranty, anti-theft devices, prepaid service plans or fabric protection.

Some people want the peace of mind that comes with extended warranties, so this is something you might want to consider (unless the car is still under the manufacturer's warranty or is a CPO vehicle). Review the dealership sales contract thoroughly. In most states, it lists the cost of the vehicle, a documentation fee, possibly a small charge for a smog certificate, sales tax and license fees.

If you are buying a car from an individual owner, make sure the seller properly transfers the title and registration to you. It's important to close the deal correctly to avoid after-sale hassles. Before money changes hands, ask for the title (which is sometimes called the pink slip) and have the seller sign it over to you. Rules governing vehicle registration and licensing vary from state to state. If possible, check with your local department of motor vehicles to make sure there are no past-due registration fees you'd be responsible for should you buy the car. Whether you buy from a dealer or a private party, make sure you have insurance for the car before you drive it away.

Once you've done the paperwork, it's time to celebrate your new purchase – maybe with a drive-through dinner. You deserve it!



Original Source: Edmunds.com, August 17th, 2016
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